Welcome to Doom9's Forum, THE in-place to be for everyone interested in DVD conversion.

Before you start posting please read the forum rules. By posting to this forum you agree to abide by the rules.

 

Go Back   Doom9's Forum > Video Encoding > MPEG-4 AVC / H.264

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 6th October 2013, 11:42   #1  |  Link
Carpo
Registered User
 
Carpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: /dev/null
Posts: 1,368
8bit or 10bit x264

I have been doing some reading about 8bit and 10bit x264 but I am still a little unsure of which I should use.

Mainly I watch most things on my PC, but sometimes I do use my PS3 to watch things on my TV, which I stream from my media PC.

I have noticed when using MPC-HC and Lavfilters , which I select either CUVID or Intel Quicksync (laptop) I notice that when playing 8bit files it uses CUVID and Intel, yet when I play 10bit it uses avcodec, which I am guessing is falling back to software.

Should I stick to the 8bit x264 or should I go to 10bit? Other than better compression and less banding when using 10bit are there any other benefits to using it?
__________________
The Internet: where men are men, women are men, and children are FBI Agents
Carpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th October 2013, 12:30   #2  |  Link
LoRd_MuldeR
Software Developer
 
LoRd_MuldeR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Last House on Slunk Street
Posts: 13,227
Hardware support for 10-Bit H.264 is pretty much non-existing. That's also the reason why MPC-HC will fall back to software decoders with 10-Bit H.264.

And I highly doubt the PS3 supports 10-Bit H.264 at all - unless the stream gets transcoded "on the fly" to some supported format, by the streaming software.

(AFAIK, the PS3 supports "High" profile at Level 4.1, but not the "High 10" profile)
__________________
There was of course no way of knowing whether you were being watched at any given moment.
How often, or on what system, the Thought Police plugged in on any individual wire was guesswork.



Last edited by LoRd_MuldeR; 6th October 2013 at 12:46.
LoRd_MuldeR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 6th October 2013, 12:47   #3  |  Link
Carpo
Registered User
 
Carpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: /dev/null
Posts: 1,368
so best to stick with 8bit then really
__________________
The Internet: where men are men, women are men, and children are FBI Agents
Carpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th October 2013, 19:37   #4  |  Link
benwaggoner
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 3,955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpo View Post
so best to stick with 8bit then really
Although it would be interesting to hear what the PS3 would do when asked to play a 10-bit file.
__________________
Ben Waggoner
Principal Video Specialist, Amazon Prime Video

My Compression Book
benwaggoner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 7th October 2013, 20:07   #5  |  Link
Carpo
Registered User
 
Carpo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: /dev/null
Posts: 1,368
Just says unsupported format, nothing that exciting
__________________
The Internet: where men are men, women are men, and children are FBI Agents
Carpo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 8th October 2013, 08:39   #6  |  Link
jpsdr
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: France
Posts: 1,948
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpo View Post
Other than better compression and less banding when using 10bit are there any other benefits to using it?
No, and these benefits seem realy significant only on animes without grain.
jpsdr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10th October 2013, 21:39   #7  |  Link
Flux
Registered User
 
Flux's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Finland
Posts: 109
How 10-bit x264 will affect timelapse videos with orange sunset glow gradients? Shouldn't it preserve those smooth gradients better than 8-bit?

The problem is that 10-bit is more demanding for CPU. What I can do to keep the quality of the video, but reduce decoding requirements? I have some 10-bit 4:4:4 encoded videos, but the bitrate is like 150 Mbit/s. CPU is running over 90% all the time going 99% which will cause laggy video for second or two when starting the video and it gets laggy everytime when the video starts from the beginning, if I use repeat playback in MPC-HC. I really like the quality of that video, but current settings seems to be too demanding for my computer.

I also tested the video with RAM disk, so hard drive is not the reason for that beginning lagginess.

I'm currently using this command-line (10-bit x264)

avs4x264mod.exe --crf 10.0 --tune grain --fps 24 --output-csp i444 --output "video.264" "video.avs"
__________________
Interlaced, 50 Hz and 60 Hz, 24 fps film. These are evil artifacts from the past which still possess modern video technology.
Flux is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th October 2013, 04:21   #8  |  Link
Biggiesized
Registered User
 
Biggiesized's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 232
It depends on your souce (>8 bit?) and if there are any banding artifacts in it already.
Biggiesized is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:36.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.