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Old 17th August 2015, 10:14   #1  |  Link
Saintly
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DTS CD ripping, burning & editing guide

I thought I would share my experience with Ripping, Burning and Editing DTS CD's.

This of course, is only done for backup purposes and fair use.
Which is particularly relevant to backups for surround sound discs that predate DVD-Audio, and are no longer easy to get or find replacements for. Your average music store does not sell DTS CD's or offer access to them. They are an old media, having been replaced by DVD-Audio (and Audio DVD), then SACD, and now Pure Audio Blu-ray. They still remain a valuable asset though and need preserving, so I would safely store originals and play only burnt copies.

Software Required (all freeware or open source)

Ripping & Burning
[1] ImgBurn can be used for both ripping and burning a DTS CD.
[2] EAC (Exact Audio Copy) can be used for ripping.

Editing
[1] Tranzcode can be used to extract mono channel wav files. Some info here.
[2] SoX can be used for editing the mono wav files.
[3] Gain.exe (volume control) and Spdifer.exe (creating final DTS WAV file) from the Ac3Filter Tools suite.
[4] FLAC.exe for removing any existing metadata.
[5] Ffdcaenc (spinoff from Dcaenc) for rejoining mono wavs. Or here.

A DTS CD is very much like a normal audio CD, except you will only hear white noise (hiss) on a standard CD player without an output to a DTS decoder enabled amplifier, as the DTS data is embedded in what appears to be normal cda tracks. Only a few CD players support these discs, and you are more likely to have success playing them using a DVD or Blu-ray player, like a PS3 for instance.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5.1_Music_Disc

The Editing is done using BAT (DOS batch) files for the specified programs. You will also need the times found in the CUE file created by EAC or ImgBurn.

The processes will be covered in 3 stages - Ripping, Editing, Burning. You can of course skip the middle (2nd) stage, if just creating a clone, which would be normal use. However, if like me, you like to modify things like track order, splits and fades etc, you can use the instructions in the Editing stage.

Let's get started.

RIPPING
I prefer to use EAC because you have greater control over what appears in your resulting companion CUE file, but you can also use ImgBurn and just edit your CUE file afterward.
[1] Load your DTS CD into your PC drive.
EAC Method
[2] Start the EAC program.
[3] Check and if needed, edit the CD details.
[4] From the Action dropdown menu, select Copy Image & Create CUE Sheet -> Uncompressed
[5] Select the location to save the single WAV file to, then click Save.
ImgBurn Method
[2] Start the ImgBurn program.
[3] Click on the Create image file from disc (button or option).
[4] On the left side of resulting window, in the second grouping, select the Destination by clicking the yellow magnifying button.
[5] In the resulting 'Save As' dialog, change the Save as type: field to WAV files (*.wav).
[6] In the File name: field, type your desired file name (i.e. Artist - Album (DTS).wav)
[7] Click Save.

Both methods should result in a single WAV file and same named CUE file.

Unless you want to make changes, then skip on to the Burning stage.

EDITING
Editing is something I occasionally do to correct things or make improvements. That could be splitting a track into two or deleting a track, rearranging track order or just doing a fade, etc.
[1] The first edit you should do, if needed, is the one mentioned in Burning - Step [1]. This is vitally important, as it could make or break your intentions.

MINOR EDITING
Sometimes you can just get away with doing judicious edits to the CUE file. Even seemingly splitting a track. However, sometimes embedded data in the WAV file will stop some players (i.e. PS3) from recognizing your changes, so in that case use the Full Editing solution.
Here is an example of minor editing (listed below some entries from an example CUE file).
Quote:
REM GENRE Rock
REM DATE 1971
REM COMMENT "EAC Rip"
TITLE "Album Name (DTS)"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
FILE "Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav" WAVE
TRACK 01 AUDIO
TITLE "First Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 00:00:00
TRACK 02 AUDIO
TITLE "Second Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 04:10:25
TRACK 03 AUDIO
TITLE "Third Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 07:03:31
TRACK 04 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 11:30:50
TRACK 05 AUDIO
TITLE "Fifth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 20:33:42
Note that Track 4 is about 9:02:52 long. Imagine the track is a medley of two tracks, with one going into the second at around 4 minutes in. It is a relatively simple process to just modify the CUE file to make another track. This new track will become the new Track 5 and the current Track 5 will need renumbering to become Track 6 (and any tracks after that would need incrementing by one too).

[2] Copy the four lines for track five and paste them after track five (inserting before track six if there is one.
[3] Rename the first line of the pasted text, to TRACK 06 AUDIO, and rename any other tracks afterward in the same manner (i.e TRACK 07 AUDIO and so on).
[4] Now go to TRACK 04 AUDIO and rename the song title (i.e. TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 1").
[5] Then go to TRACK 05 AUDIO and rename the song title (i.e. TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 2").
[6] Now edit the track time for this track (they are all start times). We need to add the 4 minutes mentioned, to the start time from Track 4, so INDEX 01 15:30:50 it is. Obviously with your own project you would be calculating this time exactly (by adjusting via listening with headphones).
The last few lines of the CUE file should now look like the following.
Quote:
TRACK 02 AUDIO
TITLE "Second Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 04:10:25
TRACK 03 AUDIO
TITLE "Third Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 07:03:31
TRACK 04 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 1"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 11:30:50
TRACK 05 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 2"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 15:30:50
TRACK 06 AUDIO
TITLE "Fifth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 20:33:42
The changed lines are in bold.
Track 5 has become Track 6, and Part 2 of Track 4 has now become Track 5. Only the (starting) time for the new Track 5 needed changing. All else was just renaming later Track numbers.
You could now go ahead and burn this disc, and end up with an extra track.

FULL EDITING
IMPORTANT - Make sure you have plenty of Gigabytes for this part of your project.
[2] We are now going to separate the album long WAV file into its separate channels, making a Mono WAV file for each. For the purposes of this guide, I'm am using a 5.1 (6) channel WAV file. To do this, I am going to use the program Tranzcode, via a BAT file, but you could use the Tranzcode GUI (made by someone else), but it has an inability to recognize the true DTS nature of a WAV file sometimes, and reports only two channels and won't let you extract to 6 channels (unless you selected 6 before loading the WAV file). So rather than deal with that problematical issue, a BAT file makes things easier (hopefully).
[a] Create a text file named Tranzcode.txt, then rename it to Tranzcode.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 4 lines (obviously you replace Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav with the name of your ripped WAV file, and the path to the Tranzcode executable with the path on your system)(I also advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"C:\Program Files\Tranzcode\tranzcode.exe" "Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav" tranz
pause
cls
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to Tranzcode.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the Tranzcode.bat file in the same folder as your ripped WAV file.
[e] Double-click the Tranzcode.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 mono WAV files.
NOTE - BAT files can be opened by any text editor for editing, and your right-click context menu in Windows usually has an Edit option for BAT files, which will open them in Notepad.

[3] We are now going to convert the six mono WAV files, from 32 bit as created by Tranzcode, to 24 bit, so that we can eventually modify them with FLAC.exe etc. To do this, we will be using the excellent audio command-line program SoX. We need to create another BAT file for this.
[a] Create a text file named SoX.txt, then rename it to SoX.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 9 lines (obviously the path to the SoX executable needs to match the path on your system)(I once again advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-C.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-C.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-FL.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-FL.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-FR.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-FR.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-LFE.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-LFE.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-SL.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-SL.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-SR.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-SR.wav"
pause
cls
Strictly speaking, you may not need to use the --norm (normalize) option, but I have found it necessary on occasion.
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to SoX.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the SoX.bat file in the same folder as your 6 mono WAV files.
[e] Double-click the SoX.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 appropriate 24 bit mono WAV files.

[4] This next step is by no means mandatory, and should probably only be done if you do feel there is a need to reduce the volume a little. I have found some discs to be a bit over-driven, so I use the following at need. I use the Gain.exe from the excellent Ac3Filter Tools suite, to lower the volume in this example, by 5 db. So once again, we need to create another BAT file.
[a] Create a text file named Gain.txt, then rename it to Gain.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 9 lines (obviously the path to the Gain executable needs to match the path on your system)(I once again advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-C.wav gain-C.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-FL.wav gain-FL.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-FR.wav gain-FR.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-LFE.wav gain-LFE.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-SL.wav gain-SL.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-SR.wav gain-SR.wav -gain:-5
pause
cls
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to Gain.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the Gain.bat file in the same folder as your 6 (24 bit) mono WAV files.
[e] Double-click the Gain.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 slightly quieter mono WAV files.

IMPORTANT
If you decided not to alter the volume, by using Gain.exe, then you should put the following 9 lines in that Gain.bat file instead, so that you avoid having to rename a lot of entries in the next step (Step 5). THIS CAN NOW BE AVOIDED by visiting here and downloading my SoXcutterFE program, which deals with the situation automatically, plus creates BAT files for two of the next stages. BAT files for all stages can also be found there in a zip file.

Quote:
@echo off
ren sox-C.wav gain-C.wav
ren sox-FL.wav gain-FL.wav
ren sox-FR.wav gain-FR.wav
ren sox-LFE.wav gain-LFE.wav
ren sox-SL.wav gain-SL.wav
ren sox-SR.wav gain-SR.wav
pause
cls
[e] Double-click the Gain.bat file to run it, and it should rename the 24 bit mono WAV files.

Last edited by Saintly; 23rd August 2015 at 21:54.
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Old 17th August 2015, 16:28   #2  |  Link
Saintly
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[5] This next bit is a bit trickier, as we are going to divide each mono WAV file into separate songs, using the wonderful SoX again. To make it less confusing, we will process each mono WAV file into its own folder. It may also be complicated by the naming, if you didn't use Step 4 above (for Gain). And yet again, we need to create another BAT file, with many lines this time. THIS CAN NOW BE AVOIDED by visiting here and downloading my SoXcutterFE program, which deals with the situation automatically, plus creates BAT files for two of the next stages. BAT files for all stages can also be found there in a zip file.

[a] Create a text file named Soxcut.txt, then rename it to Soxcut.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter the following lines (obviously the path to the SoX executable needs to match the path on your system)(I once again advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).


The following is purely an example, where the number of songs and times would need to be modified to match your situation. Currently six tracks are shown for each channel.
Quote:
@echo off
:CENTER CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_1-C.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_2-C.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_3-C.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_4-C.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_5-C.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-C.wav cut_6-C.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
etc
:FRONTLEFT CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_1-FL.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_2-FL.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_3-FL.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_4-FL.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_5-FL.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FL.wav cut_6-FL.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
etc
:FRONTRIGHT CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_1-FR.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_2-FR.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_3-FR.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_4-FR.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_5-FR.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-FR.wav cut_6-FR.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
etc
:SUBWOOFER CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_1-SR.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_2-SR.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_3-SR.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_4-SR.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_5-SR.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_6-SR.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
:SURROUNDLEFT CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_1-SR.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_2-SR.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_3-SR.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_4-SR.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_5-SR.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_6-SR.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
:SURROUNDRIGHT CHANNEL
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_1-SR.wav -S trim 0 04:11.810
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_2-SR.wav -S trim 04:11.810 =07:00.410
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_3-SR.wav -S trim 07:00.410 =09:30.800
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_4-SR.wav -S trim 09:30.800 =11:45.80
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_5-SR.wav -S trim 11:45.80 =16:41.310
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" gain-SR.wav cut_6-SR.wav -S trim 16:41.310 =20:34.800
pause
cls
++++ TO BE CONTINUED SOON ++++ For now, you may be able to piece things together using my SoXcutterFE program and the BAT files for Stages 5 through 9. The BAT files for Stage 6 and thus Stage 7 may be tricky, but 3 examples exist in the Stage 6 BAT file (6_Sox.bat) and whatever changes you make with Stage 6 need to be reflected in the Stage 7 BAT files (7_Sox-C.bat etc). All 7_Sox-#.bat files are created by SoXcutterFE.exe for your situation and may just need some specifics modified.
SoXcutterFE.exe also creates the Stage 5 BAT files (5_Flac-C.bat etc) which converts the mono WAV files to lossless FLAC files, to strip all metadata, and then back to WAV files again, ready for Stage 6 and Stage 7 (or just Stage 7).
NOTE - Once again, this step (Stage 5) may not be necessary, but I found it so eventually, to remove all instances of metadata.
NOTES - My experience has shown (thus far) that I need to strip things right back to individual songs and mono channels, and then WAV to FLAC to WAV (which is lossless) to remove all metadata.


BURNING
[1] Before burning, you may want to edit the entries in the CUE file (using something like Notepad). I would especially load the CUE file into a program like foobar2000 and audibly check (with headphones up loud) that the track start and end points are correct, making any adjustments necessary. I find I nearly always have to adjust times a little. The beauty of foobar2000, is that you can leave Notepad open with the CUE file loaded, and keep making your changes, SAVE, then double click on the entry in foobar2000 and it reloads the changed information.
[2] Load your blank CD into your PC drive. NOTE - Unless full of surety I advise using a CD-RW until so.
[3] Start the ImgBurn program.
[4] Click on the Write image file to disc (button or option).
[5] On the left side of resulting window, in the first grouping, select the Source by clicking the yellow magnifying button.
[6] In the resulting 'Open' dialog, browse for your CUE file (i.e. Artist - Album (DTS).cue) (same folder as WAV file).
[7] Click Open.
[8] I always recommend enabling the Verify option in the Destination grouping.
[9] Set an appropriate Write Speed in Settings grouping (bottom right).
[10] Click the BURN or Write button (indented bottom left).
[11] Check in a suitable player (i.e. PS3), then if satisfied and you used a CD-RW, redo with a CD-R.

NOTE - I tend to always use a CD-RW first, until I'm sure the track start points are correct in my player (PS3). They may appear correct in foobar2000, but might be slightly out in a hardware player.

Easy peasy, as simple as that.

P.S. I have provided this guide in honor of those here (and the Video Help forum) who came before me and provided me many wonderful guides and instructions in the past, that helped me greatly.

Last edited by Saintly; 23rd August 2015 at 22:29.
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Old 20th August 2015, 12:59   #3  |  Link
Stereodude
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Uh, if you want to make a backup, why are you messing with the audio and incurring a generational loss? Simply rip to an image, and burn it back to a CD.
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Old 20th August 2015, 14:03   #4  |  Link
tebasuna51
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@Stereodude
I think the purpose is edit and/or change to DVD/BD.
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Old 23rd August 2015, 18:39   #5  |  Link
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More Info

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stereodude View Post
Uh, if you want to make a backup, why are you messing with the audio and incurring a generational loss? Simply rip to an image, and burn it back to a CD.
tebasuna51 is indeed correct with his reply, but I find it passing strange you didn't notice EDIT in the title or how I created 3 sections, where only using two of them does exactly the backup you suggest, while the other allows you more control, for which I mentioned and gave reasons. You can also do minor edits to the CUE file without any loss. Some of those edits get ignored by a PS3 though, if metadata is present, so you may need to do a fuller edit, with very minor loss, to remove that metadata and get your CUE edits to work. One may wish to change track start and end points or re-arrange track order or add leading or trailing silence, etc.

Anyway, I digress. ( I do discuss LOSSY & LOSSLESS here for those who are concerned )

I have used my time over the last week, to create (code) a program, that very much simplifies the complexity I had started to dive into. Basically the executable looks after the very complex Stage 4, while creating BAT files for Stages 5 & 7. Stage 6 is where you can do optional things like adding, cutting, fading, etc ... to which end I will provide BAT examples. I have called the program SoXcutterFE and it can be downloaded from here.

All of this is but a minor part of a very much bigger project I am working on. These here are independent tools (or steps) though, and not required by that project, which is all inclusive and using most of the 3rd party programs mentioned here and several more.

Here's some screenshots from my larger project. Audio DVD unlike DVD Audio plays on all DVD & Blu-ray players.

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Name:  Video.jpg
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Last edited by Saintly; 24th August 2015 at 21:53.
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Old 13th September 2015, 17:59   #6  |  Link
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Oh wow... I've just discovered this topic!

A few months ago I posted within another topic how I managed to create hardware player 'compliant' DTS-CD's.

By-the-way, it's possible to use DVD Audio Extractor to encode a MLP PCM stream to a PCM.WAV contained stream. Or even to a DTS-CD stream complete with a .cue file


Cheers
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