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Old 17th August 2015, 10:14   #1  |  Link
Saintly
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 3
DTS CD ripping, burning & editing guide

I thought I would share my experience with Ripping, Burning and Editing DTS CD's.

This of course, is only done for backup purposes and fair use.
Which is particularly relevant to backups for surround sound discs that predate DVD-Audio, and are no longer easy to get or find replacements for. Your average music store does not sell DTS CD's or offer access to them. They are an old media, having been replaced by DVD-Audio (and Audio DVD), then SACD, and now Pure Audio Blu-ray. They still remain a valuable asset though and need preserving, so I would safely store originals and play only burnt copies.

Software Required (all freeware or open source)

Ripping & Burning
[1] ImgBurn can be used for both ripping and burning a DTS CD.
[2] EAC (Exact Audio Copy) can be used for ripping.

Editing
[1] Tranzcode can be used to extract mono channel wav files. Some info here.
[2] SoX can be used for editing the mono wav files.
[3] Gain.exe (volume control) and Spdifer.exe (creating final DTS WAV file) from the Ac3Filter Tools suite.
[4] FLAC.exe for removing any existing metadata.
[5] Ffdcaenc (spinoff from Dcaenc) for rejoining mono wavs. Or here.

A DTS CD is very much like a normal audio CD, except you will only hear white noise (hiss) on a standard CD player without an output to a DTS decoder enabled amplifier, as the DTS data is embedded in what appears to be normal cda tracks. Only a few CD players support these discs, and you are more likely to have success playing them using a DVD or Blu-ray player, like a PS3 for instance.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5.1_Music_Disc

The Editing is done using BAT (DOS batch) files for the specified programs. You will also need the times found in the CUE file created by EAC or ImgBurn.

The processes will be covered in 3 stages - Ripping, Editing, Burning. You can of course skip the middle (2nd) stage, if just creating a clone, which would be normal use. However, if like me, you like to modify things like track order, splits and fades etc, you can use the instructions in the Editing stage.

Let's get started.

RIPPING
I prefer to use EAC because you have greater control over what appears in your resulting companion CUE file, but you can also use ImgBurn and just edit your CUE file afterward.
[1] Load your DTS CD into your PC drive.
EAC Method
[2] Start the EAC program.
[3] Check and if needed, edit the CD details.
[4] From the Action dropdown menu, select Copy Image & Create CUE Sheet -> Uncompressed
[5] Select the location to save the single WAV file to, then click Save.
ImgBurn Method
[2] Start the ImgBurn program.
[3] Click on the Create image file from disc (button or option).
[4] On the left side of resulting window, in the second grouping, select the Destination by clicking the yellow magnifying button.
[5] In the resulting 'Save As' dialog, change the Save as type: field to WAV files (*.wav).
[6] In the File name: field, type your desired file name (i.e. Artist - Album (DTS).wav)
[7] Click Save.

Both methods should result in a single WAV file and same named CUE file.

Unless you want to make changes, then skip on to the Burning stage.

EDITING
Editing is something I occasionally do to correct things or make improvements. That could be splitting a track into two or deleting a track, rearranging track order or just doing a fade, etc.
[1] The first edit you should do, if needed, is the one mentioned in Burning - Step [1]. This is vitally important, as it could make or break your intentions.

MINOR EDITING
Sometimes you can just get away with doing judicious edits to the CUE file. Even seemingly splitting a track. However, sometimes embedded data in the WAV file will stop some players (i.e. PS3) from recognizing your changes, so in that case use the Full Editing solution.
Here is an example of minor editing (listed below some entries from an example CUE file).
Quote:
REM GENRE Rock
REM DATE 1971
REM COMMENT "EAC Rip"
TITLE "Album Name (DTS)"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
FILE "Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav" WAVE
TRACK 01 AUDIO
TITLE "First Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 00:00:00
TRACK 02 AUDIO
TITLE "Second Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 04:10:25
TRACK 03 AUDIO
TITLE "Third Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 07:03:31
TRACK 04 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 11:30:50
TRACK 05 AUDIO
TITLE "Fifth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 20:33:42
Note that Track 4 is about 9:02:52 long. Imagine the track is a medley of two tracks, with one going into the second at around 4 minutes in. It is a relatively simple process to just modify the CUE file to make another track. This new track will become the new Track 5 and the current Track 5 will need renumbering to become Track 6 (and any tracks after that would need incrementing by one too).

[2] Copy the four lines for track five and paste them after track five (inserting before track six if there is one.
[3] Rename the first line of the pasted text, to TRACK 06 AUDIO, and rename any other tracks afterward in the same manner (i.e TRACK 07 AUDIO and so on).
[4] Now go to TRACK 04 AUDIO and rename the song title (i.e. TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 1").
[5] Then go to TRACK 05 AUDIO and rename the song title (i.e. TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 2").
[6] Now edit the track time for this track (they are all start times). We need to add the 4 minutes mentioned, to the start time from Track 4, so INDEX 01 15:30:50 it is. Obviously with your own project you would be calculating this time exactly (by adjusting via listening with headphones).
The last few lines of the CUE file should now look like the following.
Quote:
TRACK 02 AUDIO
TITLE "Second Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 04:10:25
TRACK 03 AUDIO
TITLE "Third Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 07:03:31
TRACK 04 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 1"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 11:30:50
TRACK 05 AUDIO
TITLE "Fourth Song Name - Part 2"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 15:30:50
TRACK 06 AUDIO
TITLE "Fifth Song Name"
PERFORMER "Artist Name"
INDEX 01 20:33:42
The changed lines are in bold.
Track 5 has become Track 6, and Part 2 of Track 4 has now become Track 5. Only the (starting) time for the new Track 5 needed changing. All else was just renaming later Track numbers.
You could now go ahead and burn this disc, and end up with an extra track.

FULL EDITING
IMPORTANT - Make sure you have plenty of Gigabytes for this part of your project.
[2] We are now going to separate the album long WAV file into its separate channels, making a Mono WAV file for each. For the purposes of this guide, I'm am using a 5.1 (6) channel WAV file. To do this, I am going to use the program Tranzcode, via a BAT file, but you could use the Tranzcode GUI (made by someone else), but it has an inability to recognize the true DTS nature of a WAV file sometimes, and reports only two channels and won't let you extract to 6 channels (unless you selected 6 before loading the WAV file). So rather than deal with that problematical issue, a BAT file makes things easier (hopefully).
[a] Create a text file named Tranzcode.txt, then rename it to Tranzcode.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 4 lines (obviously you replace Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav with the name of your ripped WAV file, and the path to the Tranzcode executable with the path on your system)(I also advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"C:\Program Files\Tranzcode\tranzcode.exe" "Artist Name - Album Name (DTS).wav" tranz
pause
cls
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to Tranzcode.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the Tranzcode.bat file in the same folder as your ripped WAV file.
[e] Double-click the Tranzcode.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 mono WAV files.
NOTE - BAT files can be opened by any text editor for editing, and your right-click context menu in Windows usually has an Edit option for BAT files, which will open them in Notepad.

[3] We are now going to convert the six mono WAV files, from 32 bit as created by Tranzcode, to 24 bit, so that we can eventually modify them with FLAC.exe etc. To do this, we will be using the excellent audio command-line program SoX. We need to create another BAT file for this.
[a] Create a text file named SoX.txt, then rename it to SoX.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 9 lines (obviously the path to the SoX executable needs to match the path on your system)(I once again advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-C.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-C.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-FL.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-FL.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-FR.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-FR.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-LFE.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-LFE.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-SL.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-SL.wav"
"C:\Program Files\SoX-14-4-1\sox.exe" --norm -t wav -b 32 -r 44.1k -c 1 "tranz-SR.wav" -t wav -b 24 -r 44.1k -c 1 -S "sox-SR.wav"
pause
cls
Strictly speaking, you may not need to use the --norm (normalize) option, but I have found it necessary on occasion.
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to SoX.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the SoX.bat file in the same folder as your 6 mono WAV files.
[e] Double-click the SoX.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 appropriate 24 bit mono WAV files.

[4] This next step is by no means mandatory, and should probably only be done if you do feel there is a need to reduce the volume a little. I have found some discs to be a bit over-driven, so I use the following at need. I use the Gain.exe from the excellent Ac3Filter Tools suite, to lower the volume in this example, by 5 db. So once again, we need to create another BAT file.
[a] Create a text file named Gain.txt, then rename it to Gain.bat after entering the listed lines in [b] into it.
[b] Open the text file with Notepad (or similar), then enter these 9 lines (obviously the path to the Gain executable needs to match the path on your system)(I once again advise you copy and paste the following so the necessary spaces between elements are maintained).

Quote:
@echo off
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-C.wav gain-C.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-FL.wav gain-FL.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-FR.wav gain-FR.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-LFE.wav gain-LFE.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-SL.wav gain-SL.wav -gain:-5
"F:\Program Files\Ac3Filter Tools\gain.exe" sox-SR.wav gain-SR.wav -gain:-5
pause
cls
[c] Save the text file, and then rename it to Gain.bat if you haven't already.
[d] Place the Gain.bat file in the same folder as your 6 (24 bit) mono WAV files.
[e] Double-click the Gain.bat file to run it, and it should create 6 slightly quieter mono WAV files.

IMPORTANT
If you decided not to alter the volume, by using Gain.exe, then you should put the following 9 lines in that Gain.bat file instead, so that you avoid having to rename a lot of entries in the next step (Step 5). THIS CAN NOW BE AVOIDED by visiting here and downloading my SoXcutterFE program, which deals with the situation automatically, plus creates BAT files for two of the next stages. BAT files for all stages can also be found there in a zip file.

Quote:
@echo off
ren sox-C.wav gain-C.wav
ren sox-FL.wav gain-FL.wav
ren sox-FR.wav gain-FR.wav
ren sox-LFE.wav gain-LFE.wav
ren sox-SL.wav gain-SL.wav
ren sox-SR.wav gain-SR.wav
pause
cls
[e] Double-click the Gain.bat file to run it, and it should rename the 24 bit mono WAV files.

Last edited by Saintly; 23rd August 2015 at 21:54.
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5.1 surround sound, burning, dts cd, editing, ripping

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