Welcome to Doom9's Forum, THE in-place to be for everyone interested in DVD conversion.

Before you start posting please read the forum rules. By posting to this forum you agree to abide by the rules.

 

Go Back   Doom9's Forum > (HD) DVD, Blu-ray & (S)VCD > Advanced authoring

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 4th August 2017, 17:18   #1  |  Link
neil wilkes
Registered User
 
neil wilkes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London, England
Posts: 135
BD-J Code ossification on replicas?

Is it possible to protect our custom BD-J code on new titles that are replicated at all?
Given the content is protected with AACS, I would have thought that our custom BD-J code can also be ossified to prevent others stealing our development but really have no idea how to go about it. I have also written to Sony DADC to see what they have to say, but have yet to hear back from them - our current project is near completion & we do not want to send it to replication unprotected.

Any ideas anybody?
__________________
www.opusproductions.com
Multichannel Audio Productions
DVD-Audio/Video Authoring specialists
neil wilkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2017, 23:16   #2  |  Link
kolak
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 2,169
As far as I can tell by breaking AACS your code BD-J code becomes public. I'm not sure if there is an additional way of protecting it.
kolak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st August 2017, 08:38   #3  |  Link
neil wilkes
Registered User
 
neil wilkes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London, England
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by kolak View Post
As far as I can tell by breaking AACS your code BD-J code becomes public. I'm not sure if there is an additional way of protecting it.
I am not sure that is correct - BD-J code can usually be read simply by loading the disc into a BD-ROM drive. We have done this on several replicated discs.
We think we have found a way though - Allatori Java Obfuscator
and my code writer is working with their developers to ensure we pass both Eclipse checks as well as the Sony AF verification checks.
__________________
www.opusproductions.com
Multichannel Audio Productions
DVD-Audio/Video Authoring specialists
neil wilkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24th August 2017, 20:44   #4  |  Link
kolak
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 2,169
Yes and I assume many people do it this way, but anything on actual disc is exposed.
If "encrypting" is supported then this is is some protection.
kolak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th August 2017, 11:03   #5  |  Link
neil wilkes
Registered User
 
neil wilkes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London, England
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by kolak View Post
Yes and I assume many people do it this way, but anything on actual disc is exposed.
If "encrypting" is supported then this is is some protection.
The good news is that this seems to work.
The Allatori protection code literally makes it unreadable in a ROM drive because what is exposed simply makes no sense as everything is renamed. The trick seems to be applying this as part of the Flow Control (which is the obviously readable component).
Our worry was how PS3 would handle this as it is entirely possible it would not work as it might think it is an illegal disc and as it is impossible to check a written disc in a bloody PS3.......test mould only for certainty.
So this has been done now, and the news is that these encrypted code style discs pass Eclipse Analysis, Sony AF BD-ROM verification & they also run perfectly in both PS3 & PS4.

The next stage is the scary part - actually convincing a client to go for this on a production run. As long as we get a set of test moulds before final replication run & check these on the widest possible range of known to be difficult players it should be a win-win situation. I am not normally a fan of heavy encryption but it has taken us 3 years to get the code stabilized & at maximum efficiency and my Java geek has some seriously cool ideas in test right now (we will need Scenarist BD v6 to make it happen, as Signed Certificates will be required as we will need access to persistent storage / BD System area and there is a nasty bug in version 5.3 & 5.7 that prevents signed certificate Key Pairs being created) and we simply do not want anyone else just copy/pasting our code.

Another bonus for the fair use crowd is that this will not affect Managed Copying either.
__________________
www.opusproductions.com
Multichannel Audio Productions
DVD-Audio/Video Authoring specialists
neil wilkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25th August 2017, 20:03   #6  |  Link
kolak
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 2,169
I would send such a disc for deep testing on many players.
There use to be such a facility for DVD- is there anything like this anymore?
Testronic seams to be still there.
kolak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th August 2017, 14:15   #7  |  Link
neil wilkes
Registered User
 
neil wilkes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London, England
Posts: 135
Definitely - that has to be an absolute given.
Extensive (and I mean extensive) play testing via one of those places that runs through 100+ machines was in my mind. DVDverification or someone - I know their website.
We know it passes Eclipse ImageVerify, and it did stall in AF verify but the error this threw was definitely a false positive on close examination as the files it said were missing are definitely there.
The disc works, but the code is still in development stage at this point.
It is very promising and if it works, we have some neat ideas to implement.
__________________
www.opusproductions.com
Multichannel Audio Productions
DVD-Audio/Video Authoring specialists
neil wilkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27th August 2017, 18:13   #8  |  Link
Ghitulescu
Registered User
 
Ghitulescu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 5,501
Are the copyright laws not enough? One can legally protect a method of doing something is software, just like your Java code does...
__________________
Born in the USB (not USA)
Ghitulescu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29th August 2017, 09:01   #9  |  Link
neil wilkes
Registered User
 
neil wilkes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London, England
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghitulescu View Post
Are the copyright laws not enough? One can legally protect a method of doing something is software, just like your Java code does...
Uncertain at this point.
The only way to be certain will be to go talk to a copyright lawyer.
__________________
www.opusproductions.com
Multichannel Audio Productions
DVD-Audio/Video Authoring specialists
neil wilkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 23:14.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.