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Old 25th November 2013, 13:58   #1  |  Link
feisty2
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Import RGB96 TIFF sequence into avisynth?

I did some color adjustments for a dvd material I bought in After Effects and rendered into a RGB96 TIFF sequence
Is there any way I can import the sequence into avisynth and keep the RGB96 colorspace and then convert it to RGB48Y for other post process?

here's one frame from the sequence (every frame in the sequence has the same format like this one)
http://www58.zippyshare.com/v/11437575/file.html
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Old 25th November 2013, 17:27   #2  |  Link
hanfrunz
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You should reconsider your workflow. Why do you need 32bit/colorchannel if the endproduct is a dvd? Export in 8bit RGB, or if you won't use any filters in avisynth, directly to YV12 which is the colorspace your mpeg2 encoder will use anyway.
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Old 26th November 2013, 03:35   #3  |  Link
feisty2
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No Im not gonna encode it to a dvd. Im just saying the source is from dvd.I just wanna convert it to stack 16bit yuv444 so I can use dither_resize16 in avs
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Old 26th November 2013, 10:11   #4  |  Link
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But if the source is a dvd which is 8bit yv12, why do you want to convert it to 16bit yuv444? Can't you just open the mpeg2 in avisynth and do the processing?
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Old 26th November 2013, 11:07   #5  |  Link
feisty2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanfrunz View Post
But if the source is a dvd which is 8bit yv12, why do you want to convert it to 16bit yuv444? Can't you just open the mpeg2 in avisynth and do the processing?
because before other post processing in avs,I first denoised it with mdegrain and got yuv420p16 and used dither_convert_yuv_to_rgb (lsb_in=true,output="rgb48yv12") and got rgb48 png sequence and then did some 32bit precision color adjustments in AE, and AE gives me RGB96 results,and I wanna keep the precision >= 16bit before encoding

Last edited by feisty2; 26th November 2013 at 11:34.
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Old 26th November 2013, 12:41   #6  |  Link
Keiyakusha
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I'd like to be proved wrong, but I don't think there are filters that can load >8bit image sequences.
More than 16bit in avisynth is not possible at all. But it is not needed anyway. Even taking avisynth aside, rendering at more than 16bit only wastes your harddrive space.
I think you have 2 options. Whatever don't use avisynth but use vapoursynth instead, or don't use avisynth and feed your source to the x264 using some other way (possibly with the help of the ffmpeg or whatever). In other words: don't use avisynth ^^ Also, in either case, you might want to turn your 32bit stuff into 16bit first, otherwise I'm not sure if even tools that i suggested will be able to handle that placebo bitdepth.

Last edited by Keiyakusha; 26th November 2013 at 12:45.
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Old 26th November 2013, 13:07   #7  |  Link
feisty2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keiyakusha View Post
Whatever don't use avisynth but use vapoursynth instead.
thx for your reply,I'll give vapoursynth a try
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Old 26th November 2013, 13:12   #8  |  Link
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Quote:
Originally Posted by feisty2 View Post
thx for your reply,I'll give vapoursynth a try
Btw, I want to clarify, when I suggested vapursynth, I had 16bit image sequence in mind. I never tried to open 32 bit one so dunno if it is possible and if yes, what I'll get, dithered result or result with extra bits clamped, or it simply won't work... or whatever. But loading already rendered sequence in AE again and saving as 16bit should be trivial and pretty fast.
Also if you are really desperate, you can go with the following chain: sequence -> vapoursynth -> avisynth -> encoder.
Edit: yet another option will be to render in 10-16bit uncompressed and load that in avisynth directly with raw filter... maybe.
Edit2: and yes, I just checked vapoursynth, tiff doesn't seem to be supported so your best bet is 16bit png output from AE

Last edited by Keiyakusha; 26th November 2013 at 13:21.
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Old 26th November 2013, 13:33   #9  |  Link
feisty2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keiyakusha View Post
Edit: yet another option will be to render in 10-16bit uncompressed and load that in avisynth directly with raw filter... maybe.
I think I just found the answer, this thread solves the problem, http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=167667
I can render in 16bit SGI sequence and use the script in that thread, thx for your help
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