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Old 7th December 2015, 03:55   #1  |  Link
DJMichaelAngelo
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how to extract DTS music CD audio as multi-channel

I bought one of my favorite albums on this format called "Digital Surround" CD, which has the DTS logo on it, and says 20-bit, 5.1 channel audio. I've spent the last hour (no exaggeration!) scouring these forums, Google, and everywhere I can think of, on how to rip the various channels of this audio CD as their own separate .wav files (or FLAC, or mp3, doesn't matter) like Left, Right, Front, Rear, etc.

I've done this before with a movie DVD years ago, extracing the Dolby 5.1 channels separately as their own individual .wav files. But this DTS format has me stumped. Maybe because it's a music CD, not a DVD? I've tried about 3 different programs so far with no luck. I've read the entire internet. Can anybody please tell me if what I'm describing is even possible? I love this album and was SO looking forward to hearing the songs in a new way!
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Old 7th December 2015, 08:52   #2  |  Link
Ghitulescu
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Surely if you would have told us what programs have you employed, we might point you maybe to the same ones
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Old 7th December 2015, 10:22   #3  |  Link
SeeMoreDigital
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You can extract the dts.wav files using say: EAC, CUEripper (which is what I use) or even Windows Media Player 12.

Once you have the dts.wav file or files, you can then run them through an application called 'DTS Parser v2.0' to extract the dts stream out of the .wav container.

I've recently done this myself with all of my 'Digital Surround' CD's. And only struggled with one track from one disc
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Old 7th December 2015, 22:08   #4  |  Link
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Thanks you guys! After I posted that help message, I should've just gone to bed cuz it was so late, but I'm stubborn and really wanted to figure this out on my own. And ya know what, I actually did! SeeMoreDigital I hope you didn't go to a lot of trouble coming up with that solution - it looks brilliant and I'm sure it would've worked perfectly. Ghitulescu you're right, there were a bunch of programs I tried that were not a success (either didn't do this function exactly, or I couldn't even get them to open) and they were: TsMuxer, libdca, Tranzcode, EAC, dMpowerAmp, DVD Audio Extractor, and VLC. I should've came back to this thread last night and deleted it after I figured it all out, or at least marked it as "solved" but I was so tired by this point that it kinda fell by the wayside. Anyway, here's how I finally did this; I'll type it out step-by-step real simple in case any future users are Googling this same topic and stumble upon this thread:



Instructions for "Digital Surround" channel extraction
How to rip DTS music CD's as isolated 5.1 audio files

01) insert your DTS CD and open up iTunes to rip the tracks
02) under Import Settings, choose WAV encoder from the drop-down menu
03) make sure the Setting drop-down menu immediately underneath that says "Automatic" (not Custom)
04) download the free program called Foobar2000 and also install the DTS Decoder from the Components page:
05) it's www.foobar2000.org/components and I'm using version 1.3.9 + decoder version 0.3.3
06) take one of the wav files that iTunes ripped and drag it into the Foobar2000 window
07) right-click on it, and choose Convert, then Quick-Convert
08) select the "WAV" row (3rd from bottom?) and make sure the Output Bit Depth drop-down menu says "Auto" & Dither menu says "Never"
09) click Convert, type out the file-name you want to call it & choose folder location
10) within a few seconds, it'll create a "wav" (?) type file -- mine were quite large (100 MB+) and 4233 kbps
11) don't try to play these resulting files yet; they'll either be sped up, glitchy, or just static
12) download the free program called Audacity (I'm using version 2.1.1) http://audacityteam.org
13) install the program, open it, and drag one of your weird "wav" files into it -- it should display itself as 6 separate waveforms, on 6 different rows
14) click File up at top-left, choose Export Multiple, and make sure the Export Format (first drop-down menu) says: WAV Microsoft signed 16-bit PCM
15) click the Export button, and you'll probably have to click an Okay button 6 times after that as 6 windows come up
16) Audacity will then extract the 6 individual audio channels (2 stereo 4 mono) from that big huge "wav" file, and put 'em all in that same folder! viola!

Last edited by DJMichaelAngelo; 7th December 2015 at 22:13.
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Old 7th December 2015, 23:11   #5  |  Link
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJMichaelAngelo View Post
16) Audacity will then extract the 6 individual audio channels (2 stereo 4 mono) from that big huge "wav" file, and put 'em all in that same folder! viola!
Wow, that's a lot of work...

Out of interest why do you want/need separate pcm.wav files. What are you going to do with them?
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Old 8th December 2015, 02:26   #6  |  Link
DJMichaelAngelo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeMoreDigital View Post
Wow, that's a lot of work...

Out of interest why do you want/need separate pcm.wav files. What are you going to do with them?
I know, it sure was! I'm a DJ and music collector and love finding multi-track files for songs I've known & loved over the years -- they call them "stem packs". This is kind of like them, like one of the channels is just the vocals & beats, other one is synth-heavy, other one is mostly strings, another one is bass, etc. It's just a fun way to listen to songs you already know really well, in a totally new way. I was hoping one of the channels would be a pure isolated acapella so I could remix the song, but alas - no luck there.
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Old 8th December 2015, 07:04   #7  |  Link
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While I have yet to deal with DTS audio from a CD, SeeMoreDigital's method which uses EAC seems like the way to go instead of iTunes, not to mention it's a simple two-step affair. I also hope you set both Dither preferences to "None" in Audacity as well if the bit depth isn't originally 16 or else the operation as you know won't be lossless. This is tragically very often overlooked in Audacity so I just thought I'd do my kind deed for the day and give it some attention.
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Old 8th December 2015, 10:12   #8  |  Link
SeeMoreDigital
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Originally Posted by DJMichaelAngelo View Post
I know, it sure was! I'm a DJ and music collector and love finding multi-track files for songs I've known & loved over the years -- they call them "stem packs".
I see...

Personally I would use an application called UsEac3to v1.1.8 (with eac3to v3.31) to convert multi-channel .dts streams into individual pcm.wav channels
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Old 8th December 2015, 14:42   #9  |  Link
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@DJMichaelAngelo

Your process don't work with all CD DTS. Let me explain the problem.

1) To rip the CD DTS to wav's (your first 3 pass) you can use many software. Even Foobar2000 can do the job, but one of the best is EAC because try to recover some read CD problems. If the CD is clean all soft produce the same wav files.

2) You obtain "fake" wav files, called dtswav. For what "fake"?, because the wav header say that the content is PCM data 16 bits, 2 channels and 44100 samplerate (like was the audio of standard CD audio), and is not true, contain a special DTS track.

If you play these files you can listen only noise, but there are players (or decoders) that can recognize the DTS stream inside this wav.
Seems than, with your sample, the Foobar2000 player can do the job, but I have DTS CD samples than can't be recognized with Foobar2000.
Even eac3to can recognize some dtswav but not all.

This is the problem for what you can search solutions than don't work for you. But your solution don't work for all.

My recommended option is recover standard DTS's from your dtswav's.
There are some soft than can do that: the old Besplit, spdifer (from AC3Filter) and also the free recommended by SeeMoreDigital, DTS Parser v2.0
Like many links in google search DTS Parser v2.0, go to closed developer page: http://hypercubemx.free.fr/index.html , I attach a copy below.

Run DTSParser.exe, Add DTS file (select DTS WAV audio files in right slider), Click in Rebuild Stream and Start Batch.

3) Now, with a standard DTS, you can use many decoders to obtain your desired wav's.

Foobar2000 can do the job, but I can't understand your steps 11 to 16.
If Foobar2000 can decode the dtswav the output wav must be playable without "sped up, glitchy, or just static", if not Audacity can't solve the problem.

Even Audacity is not the recommended tool to split the wav multichannel to mono wavs, because when Audacity open a wav file convert the samples to 32 bits float by default and you need reconvert the samples to 16 bits int.

I can recommend eac3to (or the GUI UsEac3to) to decode the DTS to wav files:
eac3to input.dts output.wavs

By default the output wavs are 24 bit int (recommended), if you want only 16 bit int you can use:
eac3to input.dts output.wavs -down16
Attached Files
File Type: 7z DTSParser.7z (107.9 KB, 228 views)
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Last edited by tebasuna51; 8th December 2015 at 14:44.
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Old 8th December 2015, 16:27   #10  |  Link
DJMichaelAngelo
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Thanks again for the help, guys! Like I said though, EAC was one of the programs I tried and it just did not work for me. Can't remember the reasons why now, but it was one of many I either couldn't open or couldn't figure out exactly how to get it to do what I wanted :\
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Old 9th December 2015, 10:35   #11  |  Link
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If those DTS CDs mimic AudioCDs , then the DTS stream is hidden in the audio tracks. Therefore any CD ripper can get them, if certain conditions are met (in particular the disc should have no scratches or anything that might impair the extraction). These tracks may be played back by any CD player (or DVD/BD player) provided you use the digital output and your AVR can decode DTS. A CD player cannot play these via Analogue Out or it will kill your tweeters if not the whole loudspeakers.

These tracks are extracted as WAV but they contain the DTS audio. This can be extracted with a plurality of tools, the best having been mentioned (try eac3to, you won't regret).

What you can do with the DTS files after their extraction and conversion is your own business.



There is a second DTS format, the pure computer format - the files are stored as DTS files and can be played via laptops or computers, either through their own soundcard or via digital out. These files can be COPY/PASTE without any modifications.


I believe the commercial discs are of the first type, CD-DA, for they could implement a copy protection mechanism, no matter how lame it is. I never had one, why would I spend money when better quality may be achieved eg with DVD-Video or -Audio?!

So, the steps you should do are much much less numerous
1. rip the CD with EAC into WAV files (the whole disc as one track or a file each track/song)
2. parse them through DTSparser
3. decode/recode/manipulate the resulting files with eac3to (maybe with GUIs if you're afraid of the command line).
4. do whatever you want with the resulting audio.
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Old 9th December 2015, 13:05   #12  |  Link
tebasuna51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghitulescu View Post
...
There is a second DTS format, the pure computer format - the files are stored as DTS files and can be played via laptops or computers, either through their own soundcard or via digital out. These files can be COPY/PASTE without any modifications.
Yep, is this standard DTS format than I use to store and play. Even some standalone players, like Xtreamer, can play it.

The size of standard DTS is the 87.5% than the dtswav, and the 23% than the decoded wav/wavs.

After rip the CD to dtswav I use a batch procedure to convert all dtswav in a folder to standard DTS:

Quote:
@echo off
for %%A in (*.wav) do D:\Programa\BeSp09b7\BeSplit.exe -core( -input "%%A" -prefix "%%A" -type dtswav -fix )
rename *.dtswav *.dts
pause
Using DTSparser I found than, sometimes, add a extra DTS frame at end than is reported when decoded by eac3to:
libDcaDec reported the error "Invalid bitstream format". <ERROR>
and abort the decode.

Like is the last frame the DTS play fine and is decoded with a extra 23 ms of silence by BeHappy (LWLibavAudioSource, also the libDcaDec decoder) or Foobar2000.
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Old 9th December 2015, 16:50   #13  |  Link
SeeMoreDigital
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Yep, is this standard DTS format than I use to store and play. Even some standalone players, like Xtreamer, can play it.
Jeez... That takes me back
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