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Old 13th February 2008, 00:17   #1  |  Link
rotty
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Hi Def Disc Longevity

Has anybody carried out any tests as to the longevity of Bluray and HD DVD discs.
These discs obviously have far closer tolerances. As we all know, standard DVD's get quite stressed just taking them off the spindle in the boxes they come in, bending and twisting etc.
These stresses make not make any difference to a standard DVD but with the very close tolerance of Hi Def discs, these small changes to the physical disc may perhaps make these discs unplayable after a fairly short time.
I know that Hi Def discs are less forgiving if scratched especially for shorter wavelengths than red light i.e. blue and shorter still UV.
Has anyone any info. Thanks

P.S.
I have just read Doom9's comments in the forum: "failure rates were around 1 out of 3 for Blu-ray discs (I could be off with the percentages)" . Is this confirmed.

Last edited by rotty; 20th February 2008 at 12:57. Reason: just read info in forum from Doom9
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Old 13th February 2008, 21:40   #2  |  Link
Irakli
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rotty View Post
Has anybody carried out any tests as to the longevity of Bluray and HD DVD discs.
These discs obviously have far closer tolerances. As we all know, standard DVD's get quite stressed just taking them off the spindle in the boxes they come in, bending and twisting etc.
I know that Hi Def discs are less forgiving if scratched.
Has anyone any info. Thanks
Don't really know much about that, but I heard that Blu-Ray uses very hard coating which is quite resistant to scratches, etc. In theory this should mean higher longevity. On the other hand, Blu-Ray's reflective layer is quite close to the surface, so even small (i.e., not very deep) scratches may damage data...
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Old 13th February 2008, 21:49   #3  |  Link
rotty
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Thanks for reply Irakli
I was mostley thinking about to stesses to the plastic, i.e. small changes to the disc itself, not enough to bother long wavelength discs (CD's and standard DVD's) but with short wavelengths these changes although small will be accumalative and may totally disrupt the readability.
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Old 15th February 2008, 03:47   #4  |  Link
Blue_MiSfit
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I've had pretty bad luck so far with HD-DVD rentals from Netflix. At least 3-4 out of the 20 or so I've gotten have been at least partially unreadable. They required sending them back to Netflix and reporting them as damaged. Real DVDs - only a couple out of literally hundreds rented.

That' just my experience.
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Old 15th February 2008, 10:03   #5  |  Link
rotty
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Thanks Blue misfit interesting comment.

I see that you are re-codeing Hi Def content to fit DVD9 discs. What program are you using.
Thanks
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Old 22nd February 2008, 00:50   #6  |  Link
Rectal Prolapse
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Quote:
I have just read Doom9's comments in the forum: "failure rates were around 1 out of 3 for Blu-ray discs (I could be off with the percentages)" . Is this confirmed.
Perhaps this is taken out of context. AFAIK, this is WAY off base if you go by Blu-ray discs that are actually in consumer's hands. doom9 I think is referring to disc yields, and his information is very old if I remember correctly.

In fact, I have not heard of any mass blu-ray disc failure reports.

I hear more reports of HD-DVD problems (scratches from rental discs, combo disc problems, etc). And there have been very bad batches for certain titles, like Battlestar Galactica Season 1 HD-DVD boxsets, which appear to be quality control issues.
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Old 22nd February 2008, 02:29   #7  |  Link
Doom9
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Indeed, yields are something else entirely.. if a disc is good, I figure it should remain good.

However, within my first 10 Blu-ray discs I had two unplayables (versus 1 in 100 for HD DVD - from the infamous Battlestar Galactica set). With rented titles, I figure the hard coating would come in handy though as some people just aren't capable of handling optical discs properly (none of my CDs or DVDs ever gets scratched by me.. I might have accidentally dropped one or two (happens maybe once a year) but basically with proper care those things should all last).
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Old 22nd February 2008, 04:26   #8  |  Link
Rectal Prolapse
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Yeah it's all luck of the draw.

There have been reports of BD problems from Netflix renters - cracked discs! Could be temperature-related - winter - problems too.

Even if hd media went flash, you'll have other issues - electrostatic problems, etc. There is no perfect format - well, unless you have unlimited 100 megabit/second download speeds!
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