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rudeboymcc
15th June 2003, 18:37
hi. i've searched for at least half an hour now in google and i can't find anywehre that gives me a good answer, so please help me.

i have two seperate harddrives, one 60 gig and one 15gig, both IBM 7200rpm Deskstars, with one fat32 partition on both. at the moment i only have xp installed on 60gig, and use the 15gig for movies (so i can use the pc while encoding and to store them seperately). but now i've decided to give linux a go.

i want to put linux on the 15gig, (reformat it etc). i know i have to have a swap partition and a root partition, but what i'm not sure is about the next partition. can i use a fat32 partition for linux? or does it have to be ext2. when i do this, i want linux to access both harddrives becuase all my mp3's, work etc is on the 60gig, and i also want xp to access the linux harddrive so i can still put movies and rip dvd's to that harddrive.

so can linux be installed on a fat32 filesystem, and if not, is there any way to make xp read an EXT2 or any other linux filesystem comepletely and be able to read write edit etc?

thanks in advance.

mf
15th June 2003, 18:46
FAT32 is the best solution for interoperability. Keep your linux on ext2 (I've run linux on UMSDOS(which means you run linux on a fat drive), and it sucked), and you can leave all the rest fat32. Both will be able to write to it.

thop
15th June 2003, 18:51
i know i have to have a swap partitionnot necessarily. you can also use a file or no swap at all.

mf
15th June 2003, 18:58
Originally posted by thop
not necessarily. you can also use a file or no swap at all.
That's right. I don't have swap cause I didn't feel like it - and I have no problems.

rudeboymcc
15th June 2003, 19:10
when you say keep linux on ext2, do you just mean the main linux OS files, ie i have a swap (or not as you say), an ext2, and then the majority of the drive fat32. so the only thing windows won't be able to access is the linux os files whcih it doesn't need to access.

is the swap in linux just like the windows one? so if i don't put it on another partition then it wil jsut find space on teh ext2 one?

one more thing, how big do you reckon i should make the ext2 partition for the linux fileS?? will i ever need it to be bigger for any updates or anything? i'm going to install mandarke 9.1. i know there are many to choose from but i already have the copy and i'll use otehr versions later to make my choice.

btw, very quick replie, thanks a lot guys, i knew i could count on you.

rudeboymcc
15th June 2003, 19:19
while researching a bit more, i've thought of something whch i'm not sure if it will be better or worse.

what if I install linux and xp (both with all the programs like office etc) on the 15gig, and then leave the 60 gig for my mp3's, movies and rips, and swaps for both OS's. will this make any difference?

OvERaCiD23
15th June 2003, 21:52
It won't make a difference b/c only one OS will be in use at a time (unless you're using VMWare). Putting the OS's on the 15GB drive is the best idea if: both drives are the same speed, and you won't be installing enough programs to fill up the 15GB drive.

rudeboymcc
16th June 2003, 09:34
like i said both drives are 7200rpm IBM Deskstars, and the day i find enough programs to fill 15gigs i'll have a new pc anyway, and if it does fill up, i'll take the games and put them on the 60gig.

someoen told me i may have a problem booting linux if it's placed after xp on the 15gig hdd becuase Boot loaders can only read the beginning of hard disks. is this true?

Atamido
16th June 2003, 11:22
Man, I have a 60gig and a 120gig, and I still have to try and make space every once in awhile.

rudeboymcc
16th June 2003, 12:04
maybe we use our pc's for different reasons?

cweb
16th June 2003, 12:39
There is a Windows driver which can access ext2 now, apparently. I haven't tried it.


Originally posted by rudeboymcc
when you say keep linux on ext2, do you just mean the main linux OS files, ie i have a swap (or not as you say), an ext2, and then the majority of the drive fat32. so the only thing windows won't be able to access is the linux os files whcih it doesn't need to access.

cweb
16th June 2003, 12:41
Yes, it's true. So I have small partitions in the beginning of the hard drive for both OS's then I can have two big partitions (or more) on the rest of the drive for both OS's (in my case win98 and linux).


Originally posted by rudeboymcc
like i said both drives are 7200rpm IBM Deskstars, and the day i find enough programs to fill 15gigs i'll have a new pc anyway, and if it does fill up, i'll take the games and put them on the 60gig.

someoen told me i may have a problem booting linux if it's placed after xp on the 15gig hdd becuase Boot loaders can only read the beginning of hard disks. is this true?

rudeboymcc
16th June 2003, 13:07
k i've decided on the configuration.

60 gig:
1gig (linux swap file) - 59gig (mp3s, movies etc)

15gig:
5gig (linux) - 10gig (winxp)

now the only problem i see is with my documents folder. mine is 5 gigs by itself, and there are another 2. is there any way of telling windows to point to another folder on a different hard disk as the "my documents" folder?

Atamido
16th June 2003, 17:31
If they are the same speed, I would put the the OS on the larger drive as it will be more space for programs....just in case. Many programs don't like being installed on anything other than the C drive.

One other thing is to make sure that you put the harddrives on seperate channels as this will greatly speed up any drive to drive copying.

rudeboymcc
16th June 2003, 17:57
my mp3#s and movies have a priority over programs. i very much doubt i'll ever need more than 10gigs for windows programs, i'm only using half that now and half of it i don't use. and linux, well i'm not sure about that because i've never used it before.

how can i put both os's on c:, firstly that's impossible, and secondly, i'll put the 15 gig as primary slave (cd writer master), and the 60 gig as secondary master (dvd drive slave). that way i can also do direct copy cds without coasters.

mtc
17th June 2003, 00:41
I've got a similar setup to this.
I've got a 40GB and a 20GB drive with a dual boot winXP/linux setup.

What I have done is partioned by 40GB drive so I have the first 30GB as a NTFS partition for winXP then the next 10GB is split up for the linux partitions: 1GB swap ~4GB for / partition and what's left for my /home partition.

My 20GB HD is formatted as a FAT32 partition and I store all my mp3s movies etc on that drive. This way when I'm in linux I have complete read/write access to my 20GB drive and can't mess anything up on my winXP partition. The only pain is that if I want to work on a file in both windows and linux I have to make sure it is on the 20GB drive.

Of course what I couldn't done would be just to format the winXP partition FAT32 as well then linux could access everything.

So your setup you decscibed:

60 gig:
1gig (linux swap file) - 59gig (mp3s, movies etc)

15gig:
5gig (linux) - 10gig (winxp)


should be fine. Although (and I may be wrong here) but I think you'd be better to have your HD with OS's on it as the primary master and I'd put windows XP as the first partition on the drive.

Also make sure you install windows first, then linux after that. I have found that the easiest way to do you partitioning is just to use partition magic to split your drive into 2 partitions (it doesn't matter what format) then install windows on the first, then use the partitioning tool in the setup process of your inux distro to partition and format the second partion you created earlier as you desire (using either ext2 ext3 or reiserfs for your non-swap linux partitions).

rudeboymcc
17th June 2003, 16:43
will linux do everything i need to dual boot or will i have to start mesing around with boot.ini file etc?

btw, i've tried putting my writer on primary slave and it ruins all my cd's. it's only a 8x, so it needs the fastest port possible.

mtc
17th June 2003, 22:08
so long as you install linux after winXP it should setup the dual boot fine and put the required entries into its boot loader for you, You won't have to touch the boot.ini at all.

The only thing you may have to do (some distros even do this for you) is edit your fstab file on linux so you can mount your fat32 volumes in lionux with the correct permissions.