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Moon
5th March 2002, 11:15
Currently I'm ripping some DVDs. I also wanna rip subtitles and spread them on the net so other ppl can benefit from it too by using them in their rips or whatever. Which format should I use? I've been working with Substation Alpha so far to make my own subtitles for some foreign TV shows.

Now that I'm ripping from DVD I've been experimenting with subrip which seems quite convenient in usage. Is that a good format? Can ppl convert it to other formats easily or should I use another one? Is this format supported by software players so ppl could use it to watch their dvd rips with these subtitles?

Thanks for any info.

lexi
5th March 2002, 12:57
SubRip is a good format to distribute, if you can handle the program right. That means it sometimes has some OCR problems, but with the right settings it's a good prog. With a program like subadjust people can easily change the format, framerate etc.
regards, lexi

guillep2k
5th March 2002, 15:24
Personally, I think that the best way to distribute subtitles is by ripping them with vobsub and zip the three resulting files (*.idx, *.ifo and *.sub) to release the zip along with the movie. This three files are somewhat big when zipped (1~10MB), depending on the number of subtitle streams (languages). The main adventages of this method are:

1) Very easy for the ripper, and very low time consuming.

2) All subtitle streams are ripped at once... even those of languages you've never heard of, Director's comments, etc. I think this is a big pro, because people of more countries can get their subtitles.

3) You need not to worry about OCR, which can be very dificult or impossible in many languages (for instance, OCRs tend to confuse with a, with i, etc.). This means that with this method the subtitles will be as professional as they can be, because no flaws will be introduced in the conversion. Besides, some subtitles CANNOT be OCRd, because they're actually drawings! (small drawings like arrows, logos and other things). Also, sometimes the subtitles are placed in specific positions of the screen instead of the bottom (i.e., over a sign like "Men's" or things like this), which cannot be reproduced in most textual subtitle formats.

4) They can be easily OCRed by people that actually speak the target language, so they know if things are correct.

5) There's not always need for OCRing. Using DVobSub one can mux the selected stream (or all of them) directly into the AVI. If you have DVobSub installed in your computer, you'll be able to play an avi with selectable subtitles!!!

This method has its disadvantages, as follows:

1) Subtitles distributed this way take a lot more of space, in comparision to text formats like .srt, .ssa, etc.

2) It requires some knowledge from the user to use the subtitles distributed this way.

But, about these cons, I must say:

1) You are spreading a 700/1400MB movie... How could it hurt 10 additional MB?

2) This is because few people is using this method, for the moment. As soon as this becomes a common practice (Vite does this now, for example), players will start to support this format so users need not to worry about it. Besides, you guys do the hard part of ripping and speading, so there always will be a caring sould who takes the task of converting the subs to another format while knowing the target language.

This is my humble opinion. I really look forward for rippers to distribute subtitles in this way!

Guille

Chetwood
4th April 2002, 12:25
Originally posted by guillep2k
Personally, I think that the best way to distribute subtitles is by ripping them with vobsub and zip the three resulting files (*.idx, *.ifo and *.sub) to release the zip along with the movie. This three files are somewhat big when zipped (1~10MB), depending on the number of subtitle streams (languages).


Cool idea, however, which format are the subtitles in now? Is it still bmp in the .sub file or what? As well, can I extract them to a text or ssr file from these three files? Cause on some occasions I'd only need to rip the subtitles from DVD without the movie.

Now using your method I could do that ending up with these 3 files. But sometimes I still wanna use ssr files, so how can I extract them

- straight from DVD
and/or
- from the .sub file?

Thanks

ppera2
4th April 2002, 15:52
In my country most used format is MicroDVD (mdvd) . It has timing by frames, so will work correct by different framerates. Also, files are shortest, and as I see almost all player, plugin support it.

You can rip (OCR) titles from DVD (ripped to HD) or from Vobsub's sub files, but need to rename it to VOB...

guillep2k
4th April 2002, 15:54
Having those files (*.idx, *.ifo and *.sub) is just like having the original DVD VOBs. The .sub file is indeed in .VOB format, so they're encoded as MPEG2 overlays (2-bit rle). I mean... when you get the .sub you have the exact subtitle data from the VOB without any processing. This is why you can use them any sbt ripping tool later to generate bitmaps, perform OCR or whatever you want. Please don't get confused with other .sub file extensions which relate to text files.

Amerzone
5th April 2002, 21:42
Originally posted by guillep2k
4) They can be easily OCRed by people that actually speak the target language, so they know if things are correct.

You are supposed to do this with SubResync, isn't it? I tried it once to OCR to subrip format, but it didn't work at all (nothing displayed on SubResync window). Could you give some more details on how to do this?

5) There's not always need for OCRing. Using DVobSub one can mux the selected stream (or all of them) directly into the AVI. If you have DVobSub installed in your computer, you'll be able to play an avi with selectable subtitles!!!

And this one with GraphEdit? I guess, you wouldn't mind explaining the graph a bit to us...

TIA

guillep2k
5th April 2002, 22:11
@Amerzone:

About the muxing... I would have to check for more details. I don't think graphedit is needed at all. Nevertheless, no muxing is really needed. If the files (or a .RAR of the files) are in the same folder as the .AVI and you have vobsub installed, they will be used and selectable.

The .sub is a .vob... you just need to rename it back to .vob and then treat it as if you were ripping it for OCRing.

If you need more detailed instructions I can make you a little guide... but I would have to set up the environment for that (I'm not encoding anything right now, so...).

Guille

PS: VobSub's page (http://vobsub.edensrising.com/vobsub.php).

Chetwood
6th April 2002, 10:06
OK, here's how I did it:

- install Vobsub and during installation enter the dir where VirtualDub is installed
- start up any software DVD player so the drive is unlocked
- start VirtualDub | Filters | Add | Vobsub | Open and select the first 'real' ifo on the DVD
- select any dir the indexed files will be saved to and select GO

Now you end up with 2 files VTS_01_0.idx and VTS_01_0.sub in that dir whereas the .sub file is actually a .vob so you can rename it. Now copy the VTS_01_0.ifo from the DVD into this dir and you're ready to rar them up and spread them on the net.

Now if anyone wants to get the subtitles out of it they can use e.g. Subrip. Do it like this:

- Start Subrip and open the ifo from the dir, select your target language and check the box for the vob file
- now the subtitles get ocr'ed and you end up with a subtitle file in the ssr format which can be converted into others if necessary.

There's only 1 prob for me:

I ripped the subtitles from a DVD using the above mentioned method and alternatively the regular method where I had ripped the complete DVD to my HD first instead of only the subs straight from DVD. Now I compared those two files and they had the same size and content BUT the first sentence spoken in the movie started at different times.

So in one it began at 00:01:04,693 but in the other at 00:01:08,003 or something. I have no idea how come but I do hope that it can be fixed simply by adjusting the starting point in subrip. Still, as you're doing it manually it's possible you're off by half a second or less which might add on and that far into the movie speech and subs might get out of sync.

So the question is: how come and which of the two starting points is the correct one?

Here's an additional question in the same context: I bought the Futurama DVD RC2 set that has the 9 eps of the first season, with 3 eps on a DVD. Curiously enough the 3 eps do not have 3 seperate vobs on the DVD but they spread over 4. So I can just rip the subs of ep 2 since it does not begin with vob2 but in the middle of vob3. I have to start at vob3 and cut out the first 6 mins or so which again leads me to manual fixing of starting points which might result in speech and subs out of sync...

Beave
6th April 2002, 12:34
In the newer versions of VobSub you only need 2 files:
The IDX and the RAR (containing the SUB file). The IFO file is probably just nessary for using a OCR Program.

guillep2k
6th April 2002, 14:42
Originally posted by Chetwood
OK, here's how I did it:
Nice guide!
So the question is: how come and which of the two starting points is the correct one?
It is very strange! :confused:
I have to start at vob3 and cut out the first 6 mins or so which again leads me to manual fixing of starting points which might result in speech and subs out of sync...
Well... Vobsub has a cutter and a joiner for these cases!

And yes... As beave says, there's no much need for OCRing except you want make an SVCD or something out of that.

Guille

Schultz
7th April 2002, 04:04
Originally posted by Chetwood
Here's an additional question in the same context: I bought the Futurama DVD RC2 set that has the 9 eps of the first season, with 3 eps on a DVD. Curiously enough the 3 eps do not have 3 seperate vobs on the DVD but they spread over 4. So I can just rip the subs of ep 2 since it does not begin with vob2 but in the middle of vob3. I have to start at vob3 and cut out the first 6 mins or so which again leads me to manual fixing of starting points which might result in speech and subs out of sync... [/B]

What you should be able to do is find out which vobID and CellID they are in.. and in the VobSub configure at the bottom of the screen you can choose which VobId/CellId you want to rip off the dvd (default is all).. This should eliminate you having to Cut stuff out etc.

lovelove
12th August 2011, 13:40
In my country most used format is MicroDVD (mdvd) . It has timing by frames, so will work correct by different framerates.

Isn't the opposite the case? I thought:

sub (MicroDVD) uses framecount for timing, so time is variable and framecount is fixed
.................srt uses timestamps for timing, so time is fixed and framecount is variable

which means that the correct framerate is crucial for framecount subtitles (such as sub) whereas it does not matter at all for timestamp subtitles (such as srt)

setarip_old
13th August 2011, 18:12
@lovelove

You may have set a record, responding to a post dated April 2002 (In a thread where the most RECENT post was also April 2002) ;>}