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S36d2
8th April 2006, 02:10
Hi all,

I just burned a copy from King Kong to a double layer. I did not changed anything on the dvd-structure and kept the original layer brake.

I burned this disc on a Verbatim DL DVD+R mediacode MKM001 with a program called "B's Recorder Gold". This program was delivered with my dvd-burner (LG GSA4120B).

The problem is my stand-alone (philips lx 7000 sa) player can't hardly read the disc. After trying many times the player managed to read it once. So i wanted to check the layer transition but my stand-alone stopped playback on the layerbrake.
I tested the disc on my computer and it has no problems with reading it. I also tested this disc on another player, which is a cheap model and it did not read the disc either.

My question is could this problem caused by the way the disc is burned? Maybe i should have used imgburn for this. I will check on another stand-alone soon if it has problems there.

setarip_old
8th April 2006, 02:54
Maybe i should have used imgburn for this.That's probably a good idea - as long as you've ripped the DVD to an .ISO image (NOT a DVD"package" of individual .IFO, .BUP, and .VOB files), because IMGBurn can only process image files...

BTW, what software and procedures did you use to rip your original, purchased DVD?

S36d2
8th April 2006, 16:06
I used dvddecrypter to rip the original with the default settings. I did not ripped the disc to an image file but i can create one, that should not matter right?

setarip_old
9th April 2006, 01:06
If you want to make certain that you've retained the orginal layer break, use DVD Decrypter to re-rip your original, purchased DVD in .ISO image format - and then use IMGBurn to burn it...

r0lZ
11th April 2006, 10:06
I used dvddecrypter to rip the original with the default settings. I did not ripped the disc to an image file but i can create one, that should not matter right?Of course, I cannot agree with stearip. You can burn your files with ImgBurn, but you must prepare the ISO with PgcEdit. Do not use another ISO creation tool! Most of them are not suitable for DL DVDs, notably ImgTool Classic.

setarip_old
11th April 2006, 19:18
@rolz

Which of my two statements do you disagree with and why?

1) That's probably a good idea - as long as you've ripped the DVD to an .ISO image (NOT a DVD"package" of individual .IFO, .BUP, and .VOB files), because IMGBurn can only process image files...

2) If you want to make certain that you've retained the orginal layer break, use DVD Decrypter to re-rip your original, purchased DVD in .ISO image format - and then use IMGBurn to burn it...

S36d2
11th April 2006, 20:58
I think i found what's causing this problem. My dvd player just can't handle those Verbatim discs. The player is starting to make a lot of noise when the disc is inserted.
I have tested this disc also on someone elses dvd player and it had no problems reading it.

Is it common that DL media is not supported on all dvd players? I think i'll just need to try other media.

setarip_old
11th April 2006, 22:23
Is it common that DL media is not supported on all dvd players?What is common is that there is no consistency among players (or burners) regarding playback ability of any type of burned media.

To determine the capabilities/limitations of your DVD burner, as well as media compatibility, go to:

www.dvdrhelp.com/dvdwriters

(If necessary, open the Device Manager in the Control Panel to determine the make and model number)


To determine the capabilities/limitations of your specific brand and model of standalone DVD player, as well as media compatibility, go to:

www.dvdrhelp.com/dvdplayers
I think i'll just need to try other mediaBe extremely careful regarding DL media. Presently, it seems that (unfortunately for you) Verbatim DL DVD+R media is the only consistently reliable DL +R media.

(There have been some isolated postings indicating success with Ritek DL DVD+Rs)

r0lZ
11th April 2006, 22:45
@rolz

Which of my two statements do you disagree with and why?

1) That's probably a good idea - as long as you've ripped the DVD to an .ISO image (NOT a DVD"package" of individual .IFO, .BUP, and .VOB files), because IMGBurn can only process image files...

2) If you want to make certain that you've retained the orginal layer break, use DVD Decrypter to re-rip your original, purchased DVD in .ISO image format - and then use IMGBurn to burn it...
Both! :)

1) "IMGBurn can only process image files..." is right, but you can make an ISO with another program. You know which! ;)

2) It is not necessary to re-rip in ISO mode, since it is possible to generate an ISO for a DL DVD.

Also, I don't like the idea to rip/burn a 1:1 image. I really think that one of the important advantage of a backup is that you can remove the annoyances of the original DVD. Personally, I have never damaged an original DVD. I do all my backups simply to be able to watch the movie in optimal conditions (and, of course, to develop PgcEdit.)

setarip_old
11th April 2006, 23:19
@r0lZ

Glad to see that you're just suggesting alternative means to accomplish the same results ;>}

(It sounded like you were saying that what I suggested was incorrect...)

frank
12th April 2006, 08:28
My dvd player just can't handle those Verbatim discs.You should set the book-type to DVD-ROM before burning. This is much more compatible.

uliudo
25th April 2006, 17:18
Personally, I have never damaged an original DVD.

If only we were all so clever...

setarip_old
26th April 2006, 00:43
Also, I don't like the idea to rip/burn a 1:1 image. I really think that one of the important advantage of a backup is that you can remove the annoyances of the original DVD.I guess you'd call me a "purist" then. My purpose in backing up my DVD collection is to have a complete backup of each of them, when possible - with each of them having 100% of the original content and playing the same way each of the originals play. I'm a much happier camper, now that DL media are frequently available at a reasonable price - so that I have the option of true 1:1 copying being a good value versus buying a second copy ;>}

r0lZ
26th April 2006, 00:50
If you like to watch the studio logos, FBI warnings and movie trailers before even being able to use your remote, it's up to you. But you're probably unique in the whole world! :p
And if you really want a 1:1 copy, why don't you keep also the CSS, MV, PUOs, RPC, ARccOS crap, etc...? :scared:

setarip_old
26th April 2006, 01:01
And if you really want a 1:1 copy, why don't you keep also the CSS, MV, PUOs, RPC, ARccOS crap, etc...?If it was possible to do so, it wouldn't bother me at all ;>}

As a matter of fact, I'm all too happy to leave the "RipGuard" copy protection on my 1:1 copies of such DVDs...

r0lZ
26th April 2006, 01:14
It is possible to keep everything, except CSS and the read errors!

Anyway, that's what I suspected. You're a very strange person!

setarip_old
26th April 2006, 01:27
You're a very strange person!Definitely ;>}

hvatum
29th April 2006, 19:26
It is possible to keep everything, except CSS and the read errors!

Anyway, that's what I suspected. You're a very strange person!

Actually it's possible to keep CSS. I know because I made a copy with Alcohol 120%, burned it, and then tried opening the .VOB files straight from the DVD and it came up still scrambled. Woops!

laserfan
29th April 2006, 20:19
I guess you'd call me a "purist" then. My purpose in backing up my DVD collection is to have a complete backup of each of them, when possible - with each of them having 100% of the original content and playing the same way each of the originals play.I suppose this makes some sense, if your idea is to keep a backup off-site, in case your house gets robbed or burned or something. Then you have a copy of the exact original, provided of course it hasn't degraded over time (as writeable DVDs are prone to do).

For "the rest of us" we backup our discs and put the originals away in a safe place, and use the backup for playback over & over until it breaks. Then the original is still available to make another backup.

Point being that (I obviously agree w/r0lZ) the backup is configured the way YOU want to play the disc, not the blankety-blank DVD producers, what with all their trailers and logos and warnings and utter crapola that disrupts a movie-watching experience no end. In my case my backups always start playback at the movie. I may leave the menu intact if there's stuff there worth looking at, but I press "Menu" to get at it, and of course it pops-up after the movie is over.

r0lZ
30th April 2006, 11:39
Actually it's possible to keep CSS. I know because I made a copy with Alcohol 120%, burned it, and then tried opening the .VOB files straight from the DVD and it came up still scrambled. Woops!
Yes, you can keep the VOB files CSS encrypted with Alcohol. But that makes little sense, since there is no way for a standard player to decode them any more. That's just another way to burn a coaster!